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Sermons

Sunday School: Christian Ethics (Pt.11: Self-Defense)

January 19, 2020 Speaker: John Bell Series: Sunday School: Christian Ethics

 

  • Is it ever right for Christians to use physical force to defend themselves against physical attack?
  • Is it right to use a weapon if available?
  • Is it right for a Christian to own a gun?

 

  • BIBLICAL TEACHING
  • Jesus Did Not Prohibit Self-Defense.
  • Other Passages of Scripture Encourage Escaping from Danger.
  • Some Passages Encourage the Use of Force in Self-Defense

a. Self-Defense against an Animal: 

b. Self-Defense in a Court of Law:

c. Old Testament Passages on Self-Defense against Physical Attack:

d. Old Testament Passages on Defending Others against Attack:

e. Jesus’s Teaching about Having a Sword:

 

Other Authors Writing about Self-Defense.

a. But, Should Christians Not Expect Persecution?

 

HOW SHOULD WE TEACH OUR CHILDREN?

 

IS IT RIGHT FOR A PERSON TO USE A WEAPON FOR SELF-DEFENSE

 

IS IT RIGHT TO USE A GUN FOR SELF-DEFENSE?

  1. Arguments in Favour of the Use of a Gun for Self-Defense.
  2. Should an Individual Christian Own a Gun?

 

“Lethal Self Defence” (Jason DeRouchie)

  • Christians must not avenge ourselves but leave it to the wrath of God, executed through his just rulers.
  • Christians should expect persecution and tribulation and should respond without retaliation in order to bear witness to Christ.
  • God’s kingdom expands by sharing and suffering, not the sword.
  • Believers must love our enemies, ever remembering that God is our refuge.
  • Murder is a capital crime worthy of the death-penalty.
  • Humans must seek to preserve life.
  • When someone is assaulted, the Bible justifies defending one’s self and others, at times with lethal force. That is, the objects or witnesses of an attempted murder, kidnapping, or rape may justly use lethal means to thwart the perpetrators.
  • Christians should not carry concealed weapons for the purposes of (1) avenging ourselves, (2) retaliating for unjust treatment, (3) handling hostility, (4) advancing the Christian cause by force, (5) returning evil for evil, or (6) resisting persecution. But acts of terror and assault are different than any of these, and when faced with such realities, lethal force is justifiable, but not required.